Thursday, July 31, 2014

Yin Yin

Yin Yin is a two sided quilt.
Not large - about 34 inches wide, 27 inches high
hand stitched completely
Made in 2013
Reverse applique dot technique - the back of the dots showing rough on the linen side, the front of the dots neatly finished on the white wool side.
Both sides are the right side.  Both sides are the wrong side because the piece was quilted with the linen side facing up - the back of the quilting is the white side.
Yin Yin is the title because there is no Yang in this piece.
plant dyed linen, procion dyed velvet, white silk-wool gauze, red button thread and red silk embroidery floss around the edges.

Yin Yin was juried into Visions which opens in San Diego in September 2014.  There will be a catalogue published.

Number 96

Friday, May 16, 2014

Cross My Heart

 Cross My Heart   2010
Cross My Heart, detail

The central square is layered painted and overdyed silk on dyed cotton velvet.  The surrounding borders are silk, embroidered and quilted at the same time with silk threads.

Measures 33" h x 35" wide.
Exhibited as part of Quilt National 2011 at the Dairy Barn in Athens Ohio.  Cross My Heart was part of the touring exhibition of Quilt National and was shown across the USA and also went to France to be part of the Carrefour in 2013.

 Purchased on opening day of Quilt National, this quilt is now in private collection. 

Number 95

Friday, January 03, 2014

Layers of Time

Layers of Time
Re-purposed vintage wool blankets, vintage lace doilies, linen damask table linens, and new silk.  Completely worked by hand with hand embroidery, layering methods, and hand quilted.  2013, 92" x 92"

The final meditation panel of the Manitoulin Circle Project.  These four large panels were made by hand by Judy Martin with assistance from the wider community of Manitoulin Island. These are slow art that involved over 140 different pairs of hands, with about two dozen regular participants every week for four years. 

The titles of the four panels refer to the nurturing of our environment and memory.  The vintage fabrics in all of the panels refer to domestic ritual.

The panels are intended to be hung in the sanctuary of the Little Current United Church in 2014.  They are united by the circle in square imagery and by the use of white, a celebratory liturgical colour.

Photos of the four panels were taken by Klaus Rossler while the exhibition entitled Mended World was installed in the Thunder Bay Art Gallery september 13 - october 27, 2012.

number 94

Precious Water

 Precious Water
recycled linen damask, new silk, completely worked by hand.  Hand applique, hand piecing, hand quilted.
2013, 86" x 86"
The third panel of the magnificent Manitoulin Circle Project, created by Judy Martin with community assistance very slowly and happily.  This project lasted for four years and involved over 140 participants with a steady two dozen regulars and many drop-ins.

The four panels are currently on exhibit in northern art galleries and will be eventually permanently installed in the Little Current United Church on Manitoulin Island in 2014.

photos by Klaus Rossler
number 93

Mended World

Mended World
recycled linen damask, new silk and cotton, hand and machine pieced, hand quilted by Judy Martin with community assistance, 2012, 96" x 96"
The second of four meditation panels made as part of the Manitoulin Circle Project.  The panels showed in northeren Ontario art galleries and will be permanently installed in the Little Current United Church on Manitoulin Island in 2014.

these photographs by Klaus Rossler

number 92

Earth Ark

Earth Ark
Recycled linen damask, new silk and cotton, vintage handkerchiefs, hand and machine pieced by Judy Martin with community assistance, 2011, 90" x 90"
One of four meditation panels from the Manitoulin Circle Project.  The panels were shown in art galleries in northern Ontario and will be permanently installed in the Little Current United Church in 2014.

photography by Klaus Rossler

Number 91

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Minneonto

Minneonto, photo transfers on muslin, machine pieced, hand quilted.

I made this little quilt as a sample when I was teaching for a weekend conference put on by a quilt shop in Sudbury, Ontario.  The shop wanted me to teach a project would use new fabrics that they could pre-cut and sell.
It was the only time I've created a kit.  Participants brought their own high contrast photo copies of family photos, and I showed them how to use xylene blending markers to make clear transfers.  Those markers have since been banned.
The photos are of my parents in the early years of their marriage.  They had just purchased the highway farm ten miles out of Fort Frances where I grew up.  You can just glimpse the old granary that my father converted into a house in the above photo.  His friend Wally helped to tear the ancient barn down and push the granary into a new place for their house.
I gave this wall hanging to my father the Christmas after I made it, but my parents did not hang it.  My younger sister Nancy was not included because she wasn't yet born when the photo above was taken.  Silly me.

I call this piece Minneonto because one of my father's many achievements in the North Western Ontario community of LaVallee-Fort Frances area was to help bring television to the area.  Relay towers were put up from Duluth Minnesota along Highway 53 north to the border town of International Falls. I remember having to use a converter for years to get a signal until CBC towers were built north of Devlin.

1997
Number 90

Sunday, December 09, 2012

starry night

 plant dyed wool and silk, shibori markings,
38" wide, 43" high, embroidered and quilted by hand

2012

number 89 

Thursday, October 11, 2012

silver water

Silver Water , indigo dyed linen, shibori markings, hand quilted twice, once with sewing thread and again with embroidery floss, 15 inches wide, 35 inches long
 It reminds me of the way the lake looks at night, with a full moon's shine.
 The reverse: procion dyed cotton lower section, procion dyed rayon top section, hand quilted with sewing thread and embroidery floss,  a cotton batt.
Tucks on both front and back.  Layered seams.  Two sides.
Gifted to daughter Grace in October 2012 to celebrate so many things.  Her great job, her new apartment, her engagement to Asan.

Made in 2012.  
Number eighty eight.

Saturday, March 24, 2012

Trinity


This small quilt is a liturgical piece.

It was designed to hang in front of the pulpit in the Little Current United Church, Manitoulin Island.

Judy studied Liturgical Embroidery in 2009.

This piece is the first of the Manitoulin Circle Project - a community sewing circle that is creating four large meditation panels that will eventually hang in the church's sanctuary.

Foundation hand pieced, free-cut. Each small piece of cloth is unique.

recycled damask table napkins and silk
completed in 2011

number eighty seven

Saturday, February 18, 2012

the house with the golden windows: north wall

We lived in Kenora, North Western Ontrio for ten years in a narrow two story brick house on a quiet street. In our back yard we had tall maple trees. There was a lane.


It was the only time that I have ever lived in a town.























I studied fine art through Lakehead University at the time. The professors would come to Kenora from Thunder Bay every two weeks. Our classes were on alternate weekends.

During the last two years, my friend Barbara Sprague and I would drive to Thunder Bay for conferences with our professors. I made this house for my graduate exhibition.


At the 1994 convocation, I was awarded the chancellor's medal for the highest marks of any part time student that year. We did not attend the ceremony. By then, we were already living on Manitoulin Island.

number eighty six

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Lucky Protection

Made for my grandson Jack, who was born Friday the 13th, October 2009.




I finished it Christmas 2011.





I used red thread for protection.
On the back, I embroidered the Hemp Leaf (asanoha), a classic sashiko stitch used in Japanese infant clothing and bedding. For luck.


number eighty five

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

April Lily

A baby quilt for my youngest child, April Anne. Born in April, 1987. Entirely hand pieced and quilted.

number eighty four

log cabin flip

This is a string quilt made one block at a time. The batting and backing are layered, and then the logs are built up by stitching with machine, then flipping flat and stitching further logs. Log cabin blocks begin at the central square, usually red. Dark and light logs make up the strong design and with this method, the quilting just happens as the block is stitched. The blocks are joined afterwards by hand.


This quilt is now used at our cottage on one of the single beds in the new guest cabin.
number eighty three

Storm at Sea

I made this quilt for my husband's brother Tom and his new wife Margaret in 1988 as a wedding gift. It is from a collection of blue scraps in my collection, plus some new fabrics. I followed a pattern I found in Judy Martin's book Scrap Quilts.

Many people still think that I am the Judy Martin who wrote all those wonderful quilt pattern books but I am not her. I would reccomend her books however, as they are excellent resources for traditional piecework patterns.

number eighty two